brothers-by-Andree-Lüdtke

Photo by Andree Lüdtke

By Yay Padua-Olmedo

It’s a universal parenting experience: Boys are harder to discipline than girls.

A mother asked me for advice on making her nine year old son toe the line—because he’d mostly been a big pain in the neck and she’s about ready to give up.

I’d been in her shoe before, so I shared from my own experience. Anger, nagging or letting offenses go without a rebuke just wouldn’t hack it. What works? First, love.  Second, prayer.  Third, patience. Fourth, discipline and modeling.

Photo by Andree Lüdtke used via Creative CommonsI am proud to say that our son has grown up to be a man of integrity, displaying the same love and caring for his own family today, as exemplified by his father. Boys soon grow up and turn to men. And it’s all by His grace!

But it’s a given. Testosterone-laden males can oftentimes be rough and fight-prone. So, parents with more sons than they can handle may rally them to a common favorable pastime. Translation: team-oriented and less rowdy.

My friend Melody and her hubby Chuck have four sons. Says Melody, “I had my share of frustrations, problems, burdens and tears with each one at different stages of their lives—even now. But God is good! They are good children.”

Aside from having placed their faith in Jesus, one of these kids’ rallying factors has been their love of music, instilled in them by their father who plays the guitar, harmonica, ukulele and percussion.  Their third son became interested first.  His teachers encouraged him. Pretty soon the other brothers followed suit— and looked forward to joining the church’s praise and worship ministry.

At church yesterday, Tufe played base, Jaga keyboard, Vini guitar, and Bodi drums, as the congregation freely worshipped God. The Lord must have been pleased!

Honestly, I have not seen a bunch of brothers working together as if they’re the best of friends.

They may be quite busy with their own individual pursuits, but Tufe, Jaga, Vini and Bodi found time recently to self-produce a praise and worship album, with proceeds of the sale going to church ministry.

“We placed our heart and soul into it,” says Jaga, who wanted to compose songs that are scripturally sound. The first song written, “Heart of Gratitude,” bares these siblings’ conviction as Jesus followers.

He added, “Our parents have always been there to support us. Mom is such a sales person.”

When the album was done, I received a text message from Melody advertising her sons’ opus.

Who says more sons means you should form a basketball team? I’ll take a worshipful bunch anytime.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Ms. Celia “Yay” Padua-Olmedo is an accomplished author of three inspirational books, the first two written for young people and yuppies: “Sorry to Burst Your Bubble: Life Leadership Lessons from the Greatest Dreamer,” and “Going Up? Making Right Choices at Work;” and to encourage other grandparents and parents about God’s promises for families: “Grandparenting: Happiness and Hard Work.” All are available at popular and OMF Literature book stores. To be launched soon is “Now that You’re Boss: Timely and Timeless Lessons for New (& Even Seasoned!) Leaders.” “Going Up?” and “Grandparenting” are available in e-book format at http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=ntt_athr_dp_sr_1?_encoding=UTF8&field-author=Yay%20Padua-Olmedo&search-alias=books She is also a consultant and resource speaker on business and motivational topics; a part-time college instructor at the Southville Foreign University: and well-rounded in marketing, public relations and advertising. Yay is wife to Carmelo V. Olmedo with whom she has two children and three grandchildren.