By Nena Benigno

YOU’RE A CANDIDATE FOR HEALING MIRACLES!

Thanks in large part to amazing healing miracles, The 700 Club grew from a small local station in Tidewater, Virginia, USA to an international ministry airing in 138 countries to an estimated 360 million viewers yearly. It is now one of the longest-running shows in broadcast history. Supernatural healing was, and still is, a special focus of the show.

Pat Robertson operates CBN's only camera

Pat Robertson operates CBN’s only camera

It all began in the 60s when Pat Robertson, a businessman who knew almost nothing about television, heard God’s call to give up secular work and launch a Christian TV show. He started the Christian Broadcasting Network (CBN) with very little funds and plenty of faith. One part of the program was to invite viewers to phone in their prayer requests which volunteer counselors interceded for right in the studio.

The show won viewers, but had no paying commercials. Soon the money ran out, and CBN had racked up a debt of $40,000. That was when revival came and miracle after miracle happened. A mother called asking for prayers for her six-year-old baby with a twisted foot. Five minutes after the counselor prayed, the foot straightened out right before her eyes. A woman walked into the studio with arthritis of the spine. The hosts prayed and she was instantly healed. A woman listening to the live radio simulcast 50 miles away was  healed instantly  from the same condition! A man blind for three years called. When he woke up the next morning, he could see, and told his landlady she was beautiful. The volunteers who prayed for the callers— housewives, retired elderly folk with time on their hands and other ordinary Christians, were just as thrilled as the people they prayed for. It was a graphic fulfillment of God’s promise in Exodus 15:26: “I am the Lord who heals you.”

Donations for the show also poured in. The first 700 viewers who pledged to donate $10 a month to meet the monthly production cost of $7000 are the basis for the program title: “The 700 Club.” Now there are millions worldwide who support CBN’s faith-based ministry which does not rely on commercial product advertisements.

The 700 Club Asia, the Filipino edition of the program, continues CBN’s tradition of healing by faith and prayers. I have been a scriptwriter of the show for 20 years now, and well remember when businessman Peter Kairuz first joined in as host of the show.  He had never done it before, but in faith, he began to pray with his co-host, actress Coney Reyes,  for the healing of televiewers. After the show, he shook his head wonderingly, saying “Awesome, awesome.”  When I asked him later what was awesome, he shared that as he was praying, the Holy Spirit gave him a vision of a woman whose back was turned from him. His gaze went to her right, then to her left, then to the center of her back where her spine was. He realized that she had scoliosis, a curvature of the spine, and prayed for her. Afterwards, a woman called and shared she had been suffering from a painful case of scoliosis for quite some time.  She happened to watch the show, prayed along as Peter prayed and her spine straightened out. She was healed!

God is no respecter of persons.  You don’t have to be a pastor or a missionary to experience divine healing. As Jesus told the father of the boy He healed of convulsions: “Everything is possible for one who believes.” (Mark 9:23)

To build your faith in the power of Christ’s healing, go to a landmark Healing Conference hosted by Church so Blessed and Pastor-Author Hiram Pangilinan this Saturday, July 30, starting 8:30 AM at the Cuneta Astrodome. (For tickets, call 9280758 or 09438165838)

Gordon Robertson, Pat Robertson’s second son, had a thriving law practice and didn’t even dream he would have anything to do with The 700 Club or the ministry of healing. He was the “black sheep” rebel son, until God brought him to India and used him to heal and bring many Hindus to Christ. That story tomorrow on the third part of this series of articles on divine healing.